The witches" ointment

the secret history of psychedelic magic
  • 286 Pages
  • 1.29 MB
  • 5172 Downloads
  • English
by
History, Magic, Hallucinogenic drugs, Witch
StatementThomas Hatsis
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBF1621 .H39 2015
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 286 pages
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL27187834M
ISBN 101620554739
ISBN 139781620554739
LC Control Number2015003834
OCLC/WorldCa902021293

The Witches' Ointment is a topical book I've been hoping someone would write for a very long time. I was apprehensive with my wait because I was hoping that someone would write it with both a solid, scholarly approach as well as a sincere interest in the occult lore of flying ointments and their importance in folkloric by: 2.

The Witches' Ointment by Thomas Hatsis This book is the story of how veneficium got swept into the witch stereotype and became a tool of diabolical witchcraft in the opinions of the authorities.

It is the story of an early medieval canonical belief, outlined in the famous canon Episcopi. It is the story of how the canon’s original Released on: Aug   Read an Excerpt. Introduction A woman, alone at night, pulls a small ointment jar from a chest hidden The witches ointment book her bed.

Details The witches" ointment PDF

Opening the container, she scoops a handful of the foul-smelling goop--the witches’ The witches ointment book (lamiarum unguentum)-- into her turns to an ordinary broom in the corner, the kind her neighbors foolishly believe has no further use than sweeping or maybe killing a Brand: Inner Traditions/Bear & Company.

An exploration of the historical origins of the “witches’ ointment” and The witches ointment book hallucinogenic drug practices based on the earliest sources • Details how early modern theologians demonized psychedelic folk magic into “witches’ ointments” • Shares dozens of psychoactive formulas and recipes gleaned from rare manuscripts from university collections all over the world as w/5.

In the medieval period preparations with hallucinogenic herbs were part of folk remedies but the Church demonized these practices creating the classical “witch” stereotype and what history has called the “witches’ ointment.” This book presents dozens of these psychoactive formulas gleaned from rare manuscripts all over the world including spells, love potions, and herbal preparations.

The Witches’ Ointment Thomas Hatsis Examining trial records and the pharmacopoeia of witches, alchemists, folk healers, and heretics of the 15th century, Thomas Hatsis shares dozens of psychoactive formulas and recipes gleaned from rare manuscripts from university collections from all over the world as well as the practices and magical.

An exploration of the historical origins of the “witches’ ointment” and medieval hallucinogenic drug practices based on the earliest sources• Details how early modern theologians demonized psychedelic folk magic into “witches’ ointments”• Shares dozens of psychoactive formulas and recipes gleaned from rare manuscripts.

An exploration of the historical origins of the “witches’ ointment” and medieval hallucinogenic drug practices based on the earliest sources • Details how early modern theologians demonized psychedelic folk magic into “witches’ ointments” • Shares dozens of psychoactive formulas and recipes gleaned from rare manuscripts from university collections all over the world as well as.

The Witches’ Ointment: The Secret History of Psychedelic Magic by Thomas Hatsis, is the first full-length volume that explores the use of psychedelics and entheogens, and their role in both the wider western Renaissance culture and the more obscure, backwoods uses found in village magic.

Readers will find a detailed history of how certain folk ideas were caricatured and condemned by some. Introduction A woman, alone at night, pulls a small ointment jar from a chest hidden beneath her bed.

Opening the container, she scoops a handful of the foul-smelling goop--the witches’ ointment (lamiarum unguentum)-- into her turns to an ordinary broom in the corner, the kind her neighbors foolishly believe has no further use than sweeping or maybe killing a mouse; at present, this Released on: Septem   The Witches' Ointment by Thomas Hatsis,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(68).

The image of witches flying on broomsticks is a misconstrued truth – witches “flew” using flying ointment. In this article, we’ll discover the history of flying ointments, provide flying ointment recipes, and teach you how to create your own flying ointment recipe.

An exploration of the historical origins of the "witches' ointment" and medieval hallucinogenic drug practices based on the earliest sources - Details how early modern theologians demonized psychedelic folk magic into "witches' ointments" - Shares dozens of psychoactive formulas and recipes gleaned from rare manuscripts from university collections all over the.

Name. The ointment is known by a wide variety of names, including witches' flying ointment, green ointment, magic salve, or lycanthropic German it was Hexensalbe lit.

'witch salve') or Flugsalbe (lit. 'flying salve'). Latin names included unguentum sabbati lit.'sabbath unguent'), unguentum pharelis, unguentum populi (lit.

'poplar unguent') or unguenta somnifera (lit. The Witches' Ointment: The Secret History of Psychedelic Magic eBook: Hatsis, Thomas: : Kindle Store. An exploration of the historical origins of the “witches’ ointment” and medieval hallucinogenic drug practices based on the earliest sources • Details how early modern theologians demonized psychedelic folk magic into “witches’ ointments” • Shares dozens of psychoactive formulas and recipes gleaned from rare manuscripts from university collections al.

The ointment is known by a wide variety of names, including witches’ flying ointment, green ointment, magic salve, or lycanthropic German it was Hexensalbe (witch salve) or Flugsalbe (flying salve). In Holland, vliegzalf (flying salve) or heksenzalf (witches’ ointment).

Examining trial records and the pharmacopoeia of witches, alchemists, folk healers, and heretics of the 15th century, Thomas Hatsis details how a range of ideas from folk drugs to ecclesiastical fears over medicine women merged to form the classical “witch” stereotype and what history has called the “witches’ ointment.”5/5.

Full Title: The Witch’s Ointment: The Secret History of Psychedelic Magic Author: Thomas Hatsis Publisher: Park Street Press Pages: Release Date: August 24th, Please note: This is NOT a sponsored post. I receive no compensation for my book reviews other than a courtesy advanced copy from the publisher, to whom I make no promises regarding the ultimate inclination of.

The Witches’ Ointment The Secret History of Psychedelic Magic By Thomas Hatsis This is a fascinating and unique offering. And a book I will definitely recommend to others, especially colleagues and students. It is well-researched and written in a scholarly yet very accessible way.

In this book the author Thomas Hatsis embarks on a quest. Synopsis An exploration of the historical origins of the “witches’ ointment” and medieval hallucinogenic drug practices based on the earliest sources • Details how early modern theologians demonized psychedelic folk magic into “witches’ ointments” • Shares dozens of psychoactive formulas and recipes gleaned from rare manuscripts from university collections all over the world as Author: Thomas Hatsis.

The Witches Ointment An exploration of the historical origins of the “witches’ ointment” and medieval hallucinogenic drug practices based on the earliest sources • Details how early modern theologians demonized psychedelic folk magic into “witches’ ointments” • Shares dozens of psychoactive formulas and recipes gleaned from rare manuscripts from university collections all over.

Thomas Hatsis Paperback, pages An exploration of the historical origins of the “witches’ ointment” and medieval hallucinogenic drug practices based on the earliest sources• Details how early modern theologians demonized psychedelic folk magic into “witches’ ointments”• Shares dozens of psychoactive formulas and rec.

Recipes for the witches’ flying ointment can be found in works of 16 th century physicians/scholars Jerome Cardan and Giovanni Battista della Porta, in which the fat of infants is mixed with many various ingredients, including herbs known to have hallucinogenic and paralyzing effects, deadly nightshade and aconitum (Forbes, pp.

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The Secret History of Psychedelic Magic An exploration of the historical origins of the “witches’ ointment” and medieval hallucinogenic drug practices based on the earliest sources Details how early modern theologians demonized psychedelic folk magic into “witches’ ointments” Shares dozens of psychoactive formulas and recipes gleaned from rare manuscripts from university.

The Witches' Ointment The Secret History of Psychedelic Magic (Book): Hatsis, Thomas: In the medieval period preparations with hallucinogenic herbs were part of the practice of veneficium, or poison magic. This collection of magical arts used poisons, herbs, and rituals to bewitch, heal, prophesy, infect, and murder.

In the form of psyche-magical ointments, poison magic could trigger. The ointment that witches use is reported to be made of the fat of children digged out of their graves; of the juices of smallage, wolf-bane, and cinque-foil, mingled with the meal of fine wheat.

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The heretofore untold and true history of psychedelics and entheogens in medieval and early modern Europe. Check it out at. Examining trial records and the pharmacopoeia of witches, alchemists, folk healers, and heretics of the 15th century, Thomas Hatsis details how a range of ideas from folk drugs to ecclesiastical fears over medicine women merged to form the classical “witch” stereotype and what history has called the “witches’ ointment.”.

The writer, educator, and historian presents his new book, an exploration of the historical origins of the so-called "witches' ointment" and medieval hallucinogenic drug practices based on the earliest sources. An exploration of the historical origins of the "witches' ointment" and medieval hallucinogenic drug practices based on the earliest.

Examining trial records and the pharmacopoeia of witches, alchemists, folk healers, and heretics of the 15th century, Thomas Hatsis details how a range of ideas from folk drugs to ecclesiastical fears over medicine women merged to form the classical “witch” stereotype and what history has called the “witches’ ointment.”.The Witches (formerly titled The Witches' Sabbath) is a chiaroscuro woodcut by German Renaissance artist Hans woodcut depicts witches preparing to travel to a Witches' Sabbath by using flying is the first woodcut produced by Baldung after leaving the studio of his mentor, Albrecht Dürer, and one of the first Renaissance images to depict both witches that fly and a.Origins Emergence in the 20th century.

Prior to the late 19th century, it is difficult to locate any English use of the term sabbath to denote a gathering of witches. The phrase is used by Henry Charles Lea's in his History of the Inquisition (). Writing inGerman historian Joseph Hansen who was a correspondent and a German translator of Lea's work, frequently uses the shorthand.